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In Vivo-Like Growth Patterns of Multiple Types of Tumors in Gelfoam® Histoculture

  • Robert M. Hoffman
  • Aaron E. Freeman
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1760)

Abstract

Diverse human tumors obtained directly from surgery or biopsy can grow at high frequency in 3-dimensional Gelfoam® histoculture for long periods of time and still maintain many of their in vivo properties. The in vivo properties maintained in vitro include 3-dimensional growth; maintenance of tissue organization and structure, such as changes associated with oncogenic transformation; retention of differentiated function; tumorigenicity; and growth of multiple types of cells from a single tumor.

Key words

Gelfoam® histoculture Tumors 3-Dimensional Tissue architecture function 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AntiCancer, Inc.San DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryUniversity of CaliforniaSan DiegoUSA

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