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An Introduction to the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD)

  • Olivia W. Lang
  • Robert S. Nash
  • Sage T. Hellerstedt
  • Stacia R. EngelEmail author
  • The SGD Project
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1757)

Abstract

The Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD) is a well-established, key resource for researchers studying Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to updating and maintaining the official genomic sequence of this highly studied organism, SGD provides integrated data regarding gene functions and phenotypes, which are extracted from the published literature. The vast amount and variety of data housed in the database can prove challenging to navigate for the first-time user. Therefore, this chapter serves as an introduction describing how to search the database in order to discover new information. We introduce the different types of pages on the website, and describe how to manipulate the tables and diagrams therein to display, download, or analyze the data using various SGD tools.

Key words

Saccharomyces cerevisiae Genome database Phenotype Gene ontology Yeast 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by a U41 grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute at the US National Institutes of Health (HG001315) to the Saccharomyces Genome Database project. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Human Genome Research Institute or the National Institutes of Health. Additional members of the SGD Project include: J. Michael Cherry, Gail Binkley, Felix Gondwe, Kalpana Karra, Kevin MacPherson, Stuart Miyasato, Travis Sheppard, Matt Simison, Marek Skrzypek, Shuai Weng, and Edith Wong.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Olivia W. Lang
    • 1
  • Robert S. Nash
    • 1
  • Sage T. Hellerstedt
    • 1
  • Stacia R. Engel
    • 1
    Email author
  • The SGD Project
  1. 1.Department of GeneticsStanford UniversityPalo AltoUSA

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