Metabolomics: A High-Throughput Platform for Metabolite Profile Exploration

Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1754)


Metabolomics aims to quantitatively measure small-molecule metabolites in biological samples, such as bodily fluids (e.g., urine, blood, and saliva), tissues, and breathe exhalation, which reflects metabolic responses of a living system to pathophysiological stimuli or genetic modification. In the past decade, metabolomics has made notable progresses in providing useful systematic insights into the underlying mechanisms and offering potential biomarkers of many diseases. Metabolomics is a complementary manner of genomics and transcriptomics, and bridges the gap between genotype and phenotype, which reflects the functional output of a biological system interplaying with environmental factors. Recently, the technology of metabolomics study has been developed quickly. This review will discuss the whole pipeline of metabolomics study, including experimental design, sample collection and preparation, sample detection and data analysis, as well as mechanism interpretation, which can help understand metabolic effects and metabolite function for living organism in system level.

Key words

Metabolomics Metabolite profile Metabolic response Biomarker Underlying mechanism 


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Medical InstrumentShanghai University of Medicine and Health SciencesShanghaiChina
  2. 2.State Key Laboratory of Bio-Organic and Natural Product Chemistry, Shanghai Institute of Organic ChemistryChinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiChina
  3. 3.Bio-Med Big Data Center, Key Laboratory of Computational Biology, CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological SciencesChinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiChina
  4. 4.Key Laboratory of Systems Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological SciencesChinese Academy of SciencesShanghaiChina

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