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Metabolic Profiling: Status, Challenges, and Perspective

  • Helen G. Gika
  • Georgios A. Theodoridis
  • Ian D. Wilson
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1738)

Abstract

Metabolic profiling has advanced greatly in the past decade and evolved from the status of a research topic of a small number of highly specialized laboratories to the status of a major field applied by several hundreds of laboratories, numerous national centers, and core facilities. The present chapter provides our view on the status of the remaining challenges and a perspective of this fascinating research area.

Key words

Metabolomics Metabonomics Biomarker Metabolite identification MetID Biochemical pathway 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Helen G. Gika
    • 1
  • Georgios A. Theodoridis
    • 2
  • Ian D. Wilson
    • 3
  1. 1.School of MedicineAristotle UniversityThessalonikiGreece
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryAristotle UniversityThessalonikiGreece
  3. 3.Department of Surgery and CancerImperial College LondonLondonUK

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