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Hyperlocomotion Test for Assessing Behavioral Disorders

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Investigations of Early Nutrition Effects on Long-Term Health

Part of the book series: Methods in Molecular Biology ((MIMB,volume 1735))

Abstract

Under- or overfeeding during pregnancy can lead to behavioral deficits in the offspring in later life. Here, we present a protocol for setting up and carrying out the hyperlocomotion test for assessing behavioral symptoms such as psychosis or mania. As an example, we use the acute rat phencyclidine-injection model which exhibits hyperlocomotion and stereotypic behaviors, resembling the positive symptoms of schizophrenia.

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Correspondence to Paul C. Guest .

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Ma, D., Guest, P.C. (2018). Hyperlocomotion Test for Assessing Behavioral Disorders. In: Guest, P. (eds) Investigations of Early Nutrition Effects on Long-Term Health. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 1735. Humana Press, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7614-0_29

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-7614-0_29

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  • Publisher Name: Humana Press, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4939-7613-3

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4939-7614-0

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