Protocol

Synthetic Antibodies

Volume 1575 of the series Methods in Molecular Biology pp 363-380

Date:

Surface Engineering of Nanoparticles to Create Synthetic Antibodies

  • Linda ChioAffiliated withDepartment of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California 
  • , Darwin YangAffiliated withDepartment of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California 
  • , Markita LandryAffiliated withDepartment of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of CaliforniaLandry Lab, California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences, QB3, University of California Email author 

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Abstract

Surface engineering of nanoparticles has recently emerged as a promising technique for synthetic molecular recognition of biological analytes. In particular, the use of synthetic heteropolymers adsorbed onto the surface of a nanoparticle can yield selective detection of a molecular target. Synthetic molecular recognition has unique advantages in leveraging the photostability, versatility, and exceptional chemical stability of nanomaterials. In particular, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) exhibit a large Stokes shift and near infrared emission for maximum biological sample transparency. Optical biosensors with high signal transduction and molecular specificity can be synthesized with amphiphilic heteropolymers grafted to SWNT, and discovered by high-throughput screening. Herein, we describe the development and the characterization of surface-engineered nanoparticles, or “synthetic antibodies,” for protein detection.

Key words

Protein detection Sensors Carbon nanotubes DNA aptamers Infrared fluorescence microscopy Nanomaterials Synthetic antibodies