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FRET Imaging of Enzymatic Activities Using Smart Probes

  • Jinbo Li
  • Yan Zhang
  • Zhen ChengEmail author
Protocol
  • 1.7k Downloads
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1444)

Abstract

Tumor-related enzymes are extensively involved in the occurrence, development, invasion, and metastasis of tumors, indicating they hold the potential to serve as biomarkers for tumor diagnosis and treatment. Smart probes based on characteristic activities of these enzymes and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been widely developed for fluorescent imaging of enzymatic activities. Here, we describe the detailed chemical strategies for construction of smart probe and its application for FRET imaging of fibroblast activation protein alpha in vitro and in vivo.

Key words

Enzyme Fluorescence resonance energy transfer Peptide Fluorescent imaging Smart probe 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work was supported in part by National Cancer Institute (NCI) 5R01 CA119053 (Z.C.) and the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2011CB935800).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Chemistry and Chemical EngineeringNanjing UniversityNanjingP. R. China
  2. 2.Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X ProgramStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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