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Clinical Impact of Vaccine Development

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Vaccine Design

Part of the book series: Methods in Molecular Biology ((MIMB,volume 1403))

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Abstract

The discovery and development of immunization has been a singular improvement in the health of mankind. This chapter reviews currently available vaccines, their historical development, and impact on public health. Specific mention is made in regard to the challenges and pursuit of a vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus as well as the unfounded link between autism and measles vaccination.

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Correspondence to Puja H. Nambiar M.D. .

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Nambiar, P.H., Daza, A.D., Livornese, L.L. (2016). Clinical Impact of Vaccine Development. In: Thomas, S. (eds) Vaccine Design. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 1403. Humana Press, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3387-7_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3387-7_1

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