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Assessment of In Vitro Biological Activities of Anthocyanins-Rich Plant Species Based on Plinia cauliflora Study Model

Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB,volume 1391)

Abstract

Plinia cauliflora (jaboticaba) is a native fruit tree from Brazilian rainforest widely used in popular medicine to prevent diarrhea, asthma, and infections. Studies have shown that the major therapeutic potential of jaboticaba fruits is on its peel, a rich source of anthocyanins. These secondary metabolites have well-known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities and have been claimed to be effective to treat diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke. This chapter describes a series of methodologies to evaluate important in vitro biological activities like cytotoxicity, proliferation, and migration of a hydroalcoholic extract of jaboticaba peel on mouse fibroblast L929 line. Assays to assess total phenolic, flavonoid, and anthocyanin contents and antioxidant activities are described as well.

Key words

  • Plinia cauliflora
  • Phytochemistry
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Total flavonoids
  • Anthocyanins
  • Biological activities
  • DPPH assay
  • MTT assay
  • Scratch assay
  • EdU assay

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-3332-7_5
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Correspondence to Marcelo Maraschin .

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Pitz, H.S. et al. (2016). Assessment of In Vitro Biological Activities of Anthocyanins-Rich Plant Species Based on Plinia cauliflora Study Model. In: Jain, S. (eds) Protocols for In Vitro Cultures and Secondary Metabolite Analysis of Aromatic and Medicinal Plants, Second Edition. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 1391. Humana Press, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3332-7_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3332-7_5

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