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Interactive Deception in Group Decision-Making: New Insights from Communication Pattern Analysis

Part of the Neuromethods book series (NM,volume 111)

Abstract

Interpersonal deception is a dynamic process in which participating individuals adjust and adapt their behaviors as the deception proceeds. Using THEME, we demonstrate that deceptive communication in group settings is highly patterned. We further examine patterning behavior using the strategy-focused lens of Interpersonal Deception Theory (Buller and Burgoon, Commun Theory 6(3):203–242, 1996). Correlation and regression analyses suggest that (1) deceivers tend to be strategically assertive as they carry out deception in group settings, and (2) individuals suspicious of deception tend to engage in probing behavior, ostensibly attempting to confirm their suspicions. Our findings demonstrate the value of analyzing deceptive behavior in terms of patterning to gain greater insight into the complex deception process.

Key words

  • Deception
  • Group decision-making
  • Nonverbal communication
  • Pattern analysis
  • THEME

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Acknowledgements

Portions of this research were supported by funding from the National Science Foundation (Grant # 0725895 and #1068026). The views, opinions, and/or findings in this report are those of the authors and should not be construed as an official US government position, policy, or decision.

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Correspondence to Judee K. Burgoon .

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Burgoon, J.K., Wilson, D., Hass, M., Schuetzler, R. (2016). Interactive Deception in Group Decision-Making: New Insights from Communication Pattern Analysis. In: Magnusson, M., Burgoon, J., Casarrubea, M. (eds) Discovering Hidden Temporal Patterns in Behavior and Interaction. Neuromethods, vol 111. Springer, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3249-8_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-3249-8_2

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