In Situ Hybridization of Estrogen Receptors α and β and GPER in the Human Testis

Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1366)

Abstract

In situ hybridization (ISH) is an excellent method for detecting RNA in histological sections, both to detect gene expression and to assign gene expression to a distinct cell population. Therefore, ISH may be used in basic cell biology to detect the expression of certain genes within a tissue containing various cell populations. Here, we describe the detection and cellular localization of three estrogen receptors, both isoforms of the genomic estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ) as well as the membrane-bound G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER) in the human testis.

Key words

In situ hybridization Testis Estrogenreceptors Molecular biology Gene expression Cellular localization 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute for Veterinary Anatomy, Histology and EmbryologyJustus Liebig University GiessenGießenGermany

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