Advertisement

Microarrays in Blood Group Genotyping

  • Stephanie A. Boccoz
  • Gaëlle Le Goff
  • Loïc J. Blum
  • Christophe A. MarquetteEmail author
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1310)

Abstract

Thirty-five blood group systems, containing more than 300 antigens, are listed by the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT). Most of these antigens result from a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Blood group typing is conventionally carried out by serology. However, this technique has certain limitations and cannot respond to the growing demand for blood products typed for a large number of antigens. Here we describe a blood group genotyping assay, from genomic DNA extraction from whole-blood samples to results. After DNA extraction, the on-chip test is based on the hybridization of targets beforehand amplified by multiplex polymerase chain reaction, followed by a revelation step allowing the simultaneous identification of up to 24 blood group antigens and leading to the determination of extended genotypes.

Key words

Blood group DNA biochip Microarray Multiplex Polymerase chain reaction 

References

  1. 1.
    Logdberg L, Reid ME, Lamont RE et al (2005) Human blood group genes 2004: chromosomal locations and cloning strategies. Transfus Med Rev 19:45–57PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Logdberg L, Reid ME, Zelinski T (2011) Human blood group Genes 2010: chromosomal locations and cloning strategies revisited. Transfus Med Rev 25:36–46PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Reid ME (2009) Transfusion in the age of molecular diagnostics. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program 171–177Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Westhoff CM (2006) Molecular testing for transfusion medicine. Curr Opin Hematol 13:471–475PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Le Goff GC, Brès JC, Rigal D et al (2010) Robust, high-throughput solution for blood group genotyping. Anal Chem 82:6185–6192PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Boccoz SA, Bailly P, Brès JC et al (2013) Oral abstracts. Vox Sang 105:1–64Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephanie A. Boccoz
    • 1
  • Gaëlle Le Goff
    • 1
  • Loïc J. Blum
    • 2
  • Christophe A. Marquette
    • 3
    Email author
  1. 1.AXO Science SASVilleurbanneFrance
  2. 2.Institut de Chimie et Biochimie Moléculaires et Supramoléculaires, Equipe Génie Enzymatique, Membranes Biomimétiques et Assemblages Supramoléculaires (GEMBAS)UMR 5246 ICBMSUniversité Lyon 1 - CNRSVilleurbanneFrance
  3. 3.Institut de Chimie et Biochimie Moléculaires et Supramoléculaires, Equipe Génie Enzymatique, Membranes Biomimétiques et Assemblages Supramoléculaires (GEMBAS)UMR 5246 ICBMSUniversité Lyon 1 - CNRSVilleurbanne, CedexFrance

Personalised recommendations