Mast Cells pp 487-496 | Cite as

The Function of Mast Cells in Autoimmune Glomerulonephritis

  • Renato C. Monteiro
  • Walid Beghdadi
  • Lydia Celia Madjene
  • Maguelonne Pons
  • Michel Peuchmaur
  • Ulrich Blank
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1220)

Abstract

Immune-mediated glomerulonephritis is caused by deposition of immune complexes on the glomerular basement membrane or of autoantibodies directed against the glomerular basement membrane. Depositions lead to an inflammatory response that can ultimately destroy renal function and lead to chronic kidney disease. However, the pathological processes leading to the development of renal injury and disease progression remain poorly understood. To investigate the mechanisms of disease development in glomerulonephritis various animal models have been developed, which include as the most popular one the induction of glomerulonephritis by the injection of heterologous antibodies directed to the glomerular basement membrane. The role of mast cells and mast cell-derived mediators has been evaluated in these models. In this chapter we describe the methods that allow to set up and study the disease parameters of immune-mediated glomerulonephritis development.

Key words

Glomerulonephritis Kidney Mast cell Renal injury Mast cell protease 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Renato C. Monteiro
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Walid Beghdadi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lydia Celia Madjene
    • 1
    • 2
  • Maguelonne Pons
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michel Peuchmaur
    • 2
    • 4
  • Ulrich Blank
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Inserm UMRS-699ParisFrance
  2. 2.Sorbonne Paris CiteParisFrance
  3. 3.Faculté de Médecine site X. Bichat, Inserm U699Université Paris-DiderotParisFrance
  4. 4.APHP, Hôpital Robert Debré, Service de PathologieParisFrance

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