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Derivation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESC)

  • Nikica Zaninovic
  • Qiansheng Zhan
  • Zev Rosenwaks
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1154)

Abstract

Stem cells are characterized by their absolute or relative lack of specialization their ability for self-renewal, as well as their ability to generate differentiated progeny through cellular lineages with one or more branches. The increased availability of embryonic tissue and greatly improved derivation methods have led to a large increase in the number of hESC lines.

Key words

hESC derivation Stem cells Human embryonic stem cells hESC culture Feeder-free conditions 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nikica Zaninovic
    • 1
  • Qiansheng Zhan
    • 1
  • Zev Rosenwaks
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Reproductive Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA

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