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Introduction to Botanical Taxonomy

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Abstract

Botanical taxonomy delimits groups of plants and describes and names taxa based on these groups to identify other members of the same taxa. The circumscription of taxa is directed by the principles of classification, and the name assigned is governed by a code of nomenclature. However, changes in the principles of classification and information accumulated from different sources affect taxon circumscriptions and, consequently, the meaning of scientific names. This process is continuous but, by governing the application of names, nomenclature has enabled the construction of a sizable body of plant knowledge. Taxonomic works store botanical information, and scientific names permit the access to and linkage of this information synergistically, thus enhancing the knowledge regarding plants and disseminating it in space and time.

Key words

  • Classification
  • Description
  • Identification
  • Naturalists
  • Nomenclature
  • Phylogenetics
  • Plant systematics
  • Scientific names

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Rapini, A. (2014). Introduction to Botanical Taxonomy. In: Albuquerque, U., Cruz da Cunha, L., de Lucena, R., Alves, R. (eds) Methods and Techniques in Ethnobiology and Ethnoecology. Springer Protocols Handbooks. Humana Press, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8636-7_9

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8636-7_9

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  • Publisher Name: Humana Press, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4614-8635-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4614-8636-7

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