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Methods for Data Collection in Medical Ethnobiology

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Methods and Techniques in Ethnobiology and Ethnoecology

Abstract

In this chapter, we discuss methods for data collection in studies of medical ethnobiology. First, we present a brief discussion about traditional medical systems and approaches to study them, including medical ethnobiology. After, we indicate to the researcher some techniques that can be applied to investigations that seek to assess traditional medical systems.

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Ferreira, W.S., Alencar, N.L., Albuquerque, U.P. (2014). Methods for Data Collection in Medical Ethnobiology. In: Albuquerque, U., Cruz da Cunha, L., de Lucena, R., Alves, R. (eds) Methods and Techniques in Ethnobiology and Ethnoecology. Springer Protocols Handbooks. Humana Press, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8636-7_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8636-7_8

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  • Publisher Name: Humana Press, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4614-8635-0

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4614-8636-7

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