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Wolbachia pp 349–373Cite as

A Light in the Dark: Uncovering Wolbachia-Host Interactions Using Fluorescence Imaging

Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB,volume 2739)

Abstract

The success of microbial endosymbionts, which reside naturally within a eukaryotic “host” organism, requires effective microbial interaction with, and manipulation of, the host cells. Fluorescence microscopy has played a key role in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of endosymbiosis. For 30 years, fluorescence analyses have been a cornerstone in studies of endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria, focused on host colonization, maternal transmission, reproductive parasitism, horizontal gene transfer, viral suppression, and metabolic interactions in arthropods and nematodes. Fluorescence-based studies stand to continue informing Wolbachia-host interactions in increasingly detailed and innovative ways.

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Acknowledgments

This chapter emphasized primary sources for field-specific fluorescence methods and the diversity of systems applying these methods, with highlights featured to the maximum extent possible. Due to the number of fluorescence-inclusive Wolbachia publications, this chapter was not able to reference every single one. I sincerely apologize to authors whose works were not cited. I am deeply grateful to the hundreds of researchers whose hard work made this review possible. Thanks also to Dr. Fallon for managing this submission, Laura Ochoa for proofreading this manuscript, and the Department of Biological Sciences at Florida International University for their support.

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Serbus, L.R. (2024). A Light in the Dark: Uncovering Wolbachia-Host Interactions Using Fluorescence Imaging. In: Fallon, A.M. (eds) Wolbachia. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 2739. Humana, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-3553-7_21

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