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In Vitro and In Vivo Models for Metastatic Intestinal Tumors Using Genotype-Defined Organoids

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Inflammation and Cancer

Part of the book series: Methods in Molecular Biology ((MIMB,volume 2691))

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Abstract

It has been established that the accumulation of driver gene mutations causes malignant progression of colorectal cancer (CRC) through positive selection and clonal expansion, similar to Darwin’s evolution. Following this multistep tumorigenesis concept, we previously showed the specific mutation patterns for each process of malignant progression, including submucosal invasion, epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT), intravasation, and metastasis, using genetically engineered mouse and organoid models. However, we also found that certain populations of cancer-derived organoid cells lost malignant characteristics of metastatic ability, although driver mutations were not impaired, and such subpopulations were eliminated from the tumor tissues by negative selection. These organoid model studies have contributed to our understanding of the cancer evolution mechanism. We herein report the in vitro and in vivo experimental protocols to investigate the survival, growth, and metastatic ability of intestinal tumor-derived organoids. The model system will be useful for basic research as well as the development of clinical strategies.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Ayako Tsuda, Yoshie Jomen, and Manami Watanabe for their valuable technical assistance in the organoid culture and histological analyses.

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Correspondence to Masanobu Oshima .

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© 2023 The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature

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Morita, A., Nakayama, M., Oshima, H., Oshima, M. (2023). In Vitro and In Vivo Models for Metastatic Intestinal Tumors Using Genotype-Defined Organoids. In: Jenkins, B.J. (eds) Inflammation and Cancer. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 2691. Humana, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-3331-1_2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-3331-1_2

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  • Publisher Name: Humana, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-0716-3330-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-0716-3331-1

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