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Histochemical Staining of Vasculogenic Mimicry

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Vasculogenic Mimicry

Part of the book series: Methods in Molecular Biology ((MIMB,volume 2514))

Abstract

Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) describes a new tumor microvascular paradigm of non-endothelial cells, where aggressive cancer cells independent of angiogenesis acquire the ability to fluid-conducting vessels. VM shows worse 5-year overall survival in cancer that suggesting that VM could be a promising surgical and effective adjuvant therapy strategy in prognostics of metastatic cancer patients. The current chapter is a comprehensive review on “Main Staining Methods and Protocols in Vasculogenic Mimicry.” Here, we provide most up-to-date and detailed information upon microscopy and histology protocols for the identification and understanding of VM process in both in vitro and in vivo.

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Imani, S., Liu, S., Maghsoudloo, M., Wen, Q. (2022). Histochemical Staining of Vasculogenic Mimicry. In: Marques dos Reis, E., Berti, F. (eds) Vasculogenic Mimicry. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 2514. Humana, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-2403-6_11

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-2403-6_11

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  • Publisher Name: Humana, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-0716-2402-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-0716-2403-6

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