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Translating Attentional Control Theory to Applied Psychological Eye Tracking Research

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Eye Tracking

Part of the book series: Neuromethods ((NM,volume 183))

Abstract

This chapter will describe how eye tracking outcomes can be used to evaluate psychological processes, particularly in applied contexts (e.g., clinical anxiety disorders, elite motor performance, and rehabilitation settings). Our discussion will focus primarily on the influence of emotion on two key aspects of attentional processing related to attentional control theory: (1) attentional bias for threatening stimuli, and (2) processing (in)efficiency. We present key metrics than can be used to infer these processes and describe that previous management of outcome measures can be allocated into two categories: transferred and retrofitted. This content is primarily aimed at readers thinking about using eye tracking in the context of psychological research and practice; to help them design their task(s) and select appropriate outcome measures in order to avoid potential confounds.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    In this context, attentional control refers to the cognitive ability to regulate the allocation of attention.

  2. 2.

    While we use attentional control theory as the predominant theory governing the concepts described, it is important to acknowledge the important progressions made by more recent frameworks, such as the Integrated Model by Nieuwenhuys and Oudejans [18, 19]. We decided to focus on Attentional Control Theory within this chapter because its predictions relate to a broad range of attentional and cognitive factors, rather than conceptualizing these factors as processes governing perceptual-motor performance.

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Acknowledgments

We would like to thank David Broadbent, David Harris, and Sam Vine for their helpful feedback and comments on earlier drafts of this chapter.

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Correspondence to William R. Young .

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Young, W.R., Ellmers, T.J. (2022). Translating Attentional Control Theory to Applied Psychological Eye Tracking Research. In: Stuart, S. (eds) Eye Tracking. Neuromethods, vol 183. Humana, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-2391-6_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-2391-6_8

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