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Salmonella enterica Infection of Human and Mouse Colon Organoid-Derived Monolayers

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Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB,volume 2427)

Abstract

Intestinal epithelial organoids reflect the morphology and function of an in vivo epithelial barrier. The composition of epithelial cell types reflects the cellular composition of the original tissue (small or large intestine) and organoids can be grown from different species. Thus, intestinal organoids constitute an ideal model to investigate infections of different hosts with enteric pathogens. In this chapter, we will focus on Salmonella infection of human and mouse colonoids grown in a 2D monolayer on permeable filter supports.

Key words

  • Salmonella
  • Infection
  • Intestinal epithelial cells
  • Organoids
  • Colonoids
  • Cell culture
  • In vitro model
  • Host–pathogen interaction

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Acknowledgments

E.C.B is funded by R2N, Federal State of Lower Saxony, Germany. G.A.G. is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) priority program SPP1656/2, the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) Infect-ERA consortium grant 031L0093B and DFG collaborative research center SFB 900 TP08 (Project number 158989968).

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Correspondence to Guntram A. Grassl .

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Mouse tissue for Fig. 1 was obtained from animals in accordance with the German Animal Protection Law and were approved by the Lower Saxony State Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety animal care and use committee (approval # 2015/104). Approval for the use of human tissue for Figs. 1 and 2 was obtained by the Ethics committee of the Hannover Medical School and patients gave their informed consent (approval# 3082–2016).

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Boyle, E.C., Wunschel, E.J., Grassl, G.A. (2022). Salmonella enterica Infection of Human and Mouse Colon Organoid-Derived Monolayers. In: Gal-Mor, O. (eds) Bacterial Virulence. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 2427. Humana, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-1971-1_13

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-1971-1_13

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  • Publisher Name: Humana, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-0716-1970-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-0716-1971-1

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