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Methods and Approaches for Buruli Ulcer Surveillance in Africa: Lessons Learnt and Future Directions

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Mycobacterium ulcerans

Part of the book series: Methods in Molecular Biology ((MIMB,volume 2387))

Abstract

Over 95% of the global burden of Buruli ulcer disease (BU) caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans occurs in equatorial Africa. National and sub-national programs have implemented various approaches to improve detection and reporting of incident cases over recent decades. Regional incidence rates are currently in decline; however, surveillance targets outlined in 2012 by WHO have been missed and detection bias may contribute to these trends. In light of the new 2030 NTD roadmap and disease-specific targets, BU programs are required to strengthen case detection and begin a transition towards integration with other skin-NTDs. This transition comes with new opportunities to enhance existing BU surveillance systems and develop novel approaches for implementation and evaluation.

In this review, we present a breakdown and assessment of the methods and approaches that have been the pillars of BU surveillance systems in Africa: (1) Passive case detection, (2) Data systems, (3) Clinical training, (4) Active case finding, (5) Burden estimation, and (6) Laboratory confirmation pathways. We discuss successes, challenges, and relevant case studies before highlighting opportunities for future development and evaluation including novel data collection tools, risk-based surveillance, and integrated skin-NTD surveillance. We draw on both experience and available literature to critically evaluate methods of BU surveillance in Africa and highlight new approaches to help achieve 2030 roadmap targets.

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Timothy, J.W.S., Pullan, R.L., Yotsu, R.R. (2022). Methods and Approaches for Buruli Ulcer Surveillance in Africa: Lessons Learnt and Future Directions. In: Pluschke, G., Röltgen, K. (eds) Mycobacterium ulcerans. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 2387. Humana, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-1779-3_10

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-1779-3_10

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