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Cryptogenic Stroke and Stroke of “Unknown Cause”

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Cerebrovascular Disorders

Part of the book series: Neuromethods ((NM,volume 170))

Abstract

Cryptogenic ischemic stroke is considered a diagnosis of exclusion wherein no probable cause is identified after a comprehensive diagnostic workup. Cryptogenic stroke can be further classified as non-embolic or embolic. Embolic stroke of undetermined source can be due to paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, minor emboligenic cardiac conditions, atheroembolism, cancer-associated and paradoxical embolism through a patent foramen ovale, or less often a pulmonary fistula. Currently, risk factor control, statins, and antiplatelets are the main therapeutic measures to prevent recurrent stroke. Advances in high-resolution ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging of extracranial and intracranial vessels and of the heart and prolonged heart rhythm monitoring will be instrumental techniques to identify arterial and cardiac hidden causes of stroke. In this chapter, we discuss the phenomena of cryptogenic stroke, workup and imaging, and proposed management pathways.

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Change history

  • 26 September 2021

    The original version of this book was inadvertently published with incorrect Volume Editor affiliation. The affiliation of the

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Correspondence to Fawaz Al-Mufti .

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Gomez, F.E., Amuluru, K., Elkun, Y., Al-Mufti, F. (2021). Cryptogenic Stroke and Stroke of “Unknown Cause”. In: Al-Mufti, MD, F., Amuluru MD, K. (eds) Cerebrovascular Disorders. Neuromethods, vol 170. Humana, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-1530-0_18

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-0716-1530-0_18

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  • Publisher Name: Humana, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-0716-1529-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-0716-1530-0

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