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Sendai Virus-Based Reprogramming of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells from Umbilical Cord Wharton’s Jelly into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

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Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cells

Part of the book series: Methods in Molecular Biology ((MIMB,volume 1357))

Abstract

In an attempt to bring pluripotent stem cell biology closer to reaching its full potential, many groups have focused on improving reprogramming protocols over the past several years. The episomal modified Sendai virus-based vector has emerged as one of the most practical ones. Here we describe reprogramming of mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) derived from umbilical cord Wharton’s Jelly into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) using genome non-integrating Sendai virus-based vectors. The detailed protocols of iPSC colony cryopreservation (vitrification) and adaption to feeder-free culture conditions are also included.

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Acknowledgments

The study was supported by the studentship to C.M. from the Medical Research Council, UK.

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Miere, C., Devito, L., Ilic, D. (2014). Sendai Virus-Based Reprogramming of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells from Umbilical Cord Wharton’s Jelly into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. In: Turksen, K., Nagy, A. (eds) Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cells. Methods in Molecular Biology, vol 1357. Humana Press, New York, NY. https://doi.org/10.1007/7651_2014_163

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/7651_2014_163

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  • Publisher Name: Humana Press, New York, NY

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-4939-3054-8

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-4939-3055-5

  • eBook Packages: Springer Protocols

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