Differentiation of Endothelial Cells from Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

  • Shijun Hu
  • Preston Lavinghousez
  • Zongjin Li
  • Joseph C. Wu
Protocol

Abstract

Endothelial cells line the entire circulatory system and form the interface between the blood vessel intima and the circulating red blood cells. Endothelial cells are crucial to the proper function of the circulatory system and tissue viability, including their roles in coagulation, fibrinolysis, inflammation, and most specifically, vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Given the importance of endothelial cells in vascular formation, it is essential to expand our knowledge of endothelial cell physiology and growth. The vasculogenic and angiogenic properties that enable new vascular networks to form and consequently perfuse ischemic tissues make endothelial cells an essential element of potential novel therapies. In this chapter, we describe a three-step technique to derive endothelial cells from human embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells using a three-dimensional embryoid body formation protocol. A technique to derive a highly pure endothelial population using flow cytometry will also be discussed.

Key words

Human embryonic stem cells Induced pluripotent stem cells Endothelial cells Embryoid body Angiogenesis Vasculogenesis 

Copyright information

© Humana Press 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shijun Hu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Preston Lavinghousez
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zongjin Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Joseph C. Wu
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Division of CardiologyStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  3. 3.Institute of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative MedicineStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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