Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface Plasmon Field-Enhanced Fluorescence Spectroscopy for Sensitive Detection of Tumor Markers

  • Yusuke Arima
  • Yuji Teramura
  • Hiromi Takiguchi
  • Keiko Kawano
  • Hidetoshi Kotera
  • Hiroo Iwata
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 503)

Summary

Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which provides real-time, in situ analysis of dynamic surface events, is a valuable tool for studying interactions between biomolecules. In the clinical diagnosis of tumor markers in human blood, SPR is applied to detect the formation of a sandwich-type immune complex composed of a primary antibody immobilized on a sensor surface, the tumor marker, and a secondary antibody. However, the SPR signal is quite low due to the minute amounts (ng-pg/mL) of most tumor markers in blood. We have shown that the SPR signal can be amplified by applying an antibody against the secondary antibody or streptavidin-conjugated nanobeads that specifically accumulate on the secondary antibody. Another method employed for highly sensitive detection is the surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy-based immunoassay, which utilizes the enhanced electric field intensity at a metal/water interface to excite a fluorophore. Fluorescence intensity attributed to binding of a fluorophore-labeled secondary antibody is increased due to the enhanced field in the SPR condition and can be monitored in real time.

Keywords

Surface plasmon resonance Immunosensing Tumor marker Signal amplification Polyclonal antibody Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy. 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press, a part of Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, a part of Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yusuke Arima
    • 1
  • Yuji Teramura
    • 2
  • Hiromi Takiguchi
    • 3
  • Keiko Kawano
    • 3
  • Hidetoshi Kotera
    • 4
  • Hiroo Iwata
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Frontier Medical SciencesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Polymer Chemistry, Graduate School of EngineeringKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Advanced Software Technology and Mechatronics ResearchInstitute of KyotoKyotoJapan
  4. 4.Department of Microengineering, Graduate School of EngineeringKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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