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Methods for In Vitro Metal Carcinogenesis Testing

  • Max Costa
Protocol
Part of the Biological Methods book series (BM)

General Introduction

It is beyond the scope of this book to describe detailed procedures for using all types of in vitro carcinogenesis testing systems available. Additionally, many in vitro systems available for rapid cancer testing of organic materials are not applicable to the testing of the carcinogenic activity of metals and their compounds. Therefore, we will confine our discussion only to those systems that are appropriate to the testing of metal carcinogenesis. An additional constraint will be whether or not the system has been used in the laboratory for the analysis of carcinogenesis, and whether or not the results obtained are both meaningful and reproducible. These restrictions will limit the number of systems discussed, but the ones dealt with here will be treated in considerable detail. Our discussion of metal carcinogenesis test systems will begin with the most useful and meaningful system for the determination of the cancer causing potential of a metal or its compounds,...

Keywords

Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Metal Compound Syrian Hamster Metal Sample Morphological Transformation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc. 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • Max Costa
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Texas Medical School at Houston

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