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Cloning of Exotic/Endangered Species: Desert Bighorn Sheep

  • James “Buck” Williams
  • Taeyoung Shin
  • Ling Liu
  • Gabriela Flores-Foxworth
  • Juan Romano
  • Alice Blue-McClendon
  • Duane Kraemer
  • Mark E. Westhusin
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 348)

Abstract

Cloning using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) may be a useful tool for conserving genetic diversity and for propagating exotic and/or endangered animal species. Somatic cells can be obtained easily, expanded in culture, cryopreserved, and thawed at a later date for use in NT. Significant challenges relevant to using SCNT for cloning wild and endangered animal species include the need for using interspecies NT and interspecies embryo transfer. Animal care and welfare issues raised that are unique to exotic and endangered species also are rasied. In this chapter, the methods used in attempts to clone the wild animal species of Desert Bighorn Sheep are described.

Key Words

Animal cloning somatic cell nuclear transfer SCNT interspecies nuclear transfer interspecies embryo transfer genetic conservation genetic diversity endangered animal species wild animal species interspecies surrogacy animal welfare Desert Bighorn Sheep 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • James “Buck” Williams
    • 1
  • Taeyoung Shin
    • 1
  • Ling Liu
    • 1
  • Gabriela Flores-Foxworth
    • 1
  • Juan Romano
    • 1
  • Alice Blue-McClendon
    • 1
  • Duane Kraemer
    • 1
  • Mark E. Westhusin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Veterinary Physiology and PharmacologyTexas A&M UniversityCollege Station

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