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A Novel Method to Identify Syncytiotrophoblast-Derived RNA Products Representative of Trisomy 21 Placental RNA in Maternal Plasma

  • Attie T. J. J. Go
  • Allerdien Visser
  • Marie van Dijk
  • Monique A. M. Mulders
  • Paul Eijk
  • Bauke Ylstra
  • Marinus A. Blankenstein
  • John M. G. van Vugt
  • Cees B. M. Oudejans
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 444)

Summary

A novel in vitro method is described wherein gene expression profiling is reflective and informative for the way how syncytiotrophoblast cells shed RNA products in vivo in maternal plasma. After controlled denudation, RNA is obtained selectively from the syncytiotrophoblast cells of trisomy 21 placentae. cDNA copies are subsequently analyzed by microarray profiling and cDNA cloning with sequencing. Given the preponderance of 5′ mRNA fragments lacking a poly-A tail, the placental RNA products are amplified after polymerase A-mediated tailing by using a method originally designed for small-sized microRNAs. This approach, when combined with cDNA library or microarray expression screening, is a novel in vitro method to screen for syncytiotrophoblast-derived RNA products representative of trisomy 21 placental RNA as present in vivo in maternal plasma.

Key Words

Placenta maternal plasma RNA syncytiotrophoblast trisomy 21 denudation. 

Notes

Acknowledgement

M.v.D. is supported by the SAFE Network Project LSHB-CT-2004-503243).

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Copyright information

© Humana Press, a part of Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Attie T. J. J. Go
    • 1
  • Allerdien Visser
    • 1
  • Marie van Dijk
    • 1
  • Monique A. M. Mulders
    • 1
  • Paul Eijk
    • 1
  • Bauke Ylstra
    • 1
  • Marinus A. Blankenstein
    • 1
  • John M. G. van Vugt
    • 1
  • Cees B. M. Oudejans
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics/GynecologyVU University Medical CenterThe Netherlands

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