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Peptide Sequence Determination

  • Linda A. Fothergill-Gilmore
Protocol
Part of the Biological Methods book series (BM)

Abstract

The reasons for requiring amino acid sequence information are many. A scientific project might need to elucidate an enzyme mechanism, or design a probe to isolate a gene, or find a good antigen for vaccine development. Two experimental approaches are available for the determination of amino acid sequences. One strategy is to purify the particular protein or peptide and to determine its sequence by direct chemical procedures, usually with the assistance of automated instruments. Alternatively, the sequence can be deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the corresponding genes or cDNA. Recent technological developments have enabled direct protein sequencing to be done conveniently and at very high levels of sensitivity.

Keywords

Amino Acid Analysis Amino Acid Side Chain Edman Degradation Cleavage Procedure Polypeptide Backbone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press Inc 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Linda A. Fothergill-Gilmore
    • 1
  1. 1.University of EdinburghEdinburghScotland

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