Advertisement

Gelatin Nanoparticles

  • Rania M. HathoutEmail author
  • Abdelkader A. Metwally
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 2000)

Abstract

Currently, gelatin nanoparticles are gaining more grounds in drug and gene delivery throughout all the available several routes of administration. Yet, the homogenous and less disperse preparation of this type of nanoparticles is still a challenging task due to the variation of the gelatin quality according to its source and due to its variable molecular weight. Accordingly, several methods were proposed from which the double-desolvation method has been proven to yield optimum results regarding particle size and homogeneity. Thereby, we describe in this chapter a detailed procedure of this method. We also introduce our protocols of the cationization of this kind of nanoparticles as it is extensively needed in case of loading genetic materials or proteins. Additionally, FITC labeling of gelatin nanoparticles that is usually utilized for purposes of imaging or bio-distribution studies is also introduced step by step.

Key words

Gelatin Nanoparticles Desolvation Cationization FITC Labeling Drug delivery Gene 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank Dr. Reza Nejadnik, Leiden/Amsterdam Centre for Drug Research, for introducing us to several important points in the preparation of gelatin nanoparticles.

References

  1. 1.
    Abozeid SM, Hathout RM, Abou-Aisha K (2016) Silencing of the metastasis-linked gene, AEG-1, using siRNA-loaded cholamine surface-modified gelatin nanoparticles in the breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7. Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 145:607–616CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Hathout RM, Omran MK (2016) Gelatin-based particulate systems in ocular drug delivery. Pharm Dev Technol 21(3):379–386CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Sahoo N, Sahoo RK, Biswas N, Guha A, Kuotsu K (2015) Recent advancement of gelatin nanoparticles in drug and vaccine delivery. Int J Biol Macromol 81:317–331CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Elzoghby AO (2013) Gelatin-based nanoparticles as drug and gene delivery systems: reviewing three decades of research. J Control Release 172(3):1075–1091CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Coester CJ, Langer K, van BH, Kreuter J (2000) Gelatin nanoparticles by two step desolvation—a new preparation method, surface modifications and cell uptake. J Microencapsul 17(2):187–193CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Farid MM, Hathout RM, Fawzy M, Abou-Aisha K (2014) Silencing of the scavenger receptor (Class B - Type 1) gene using siRNA-loaded chitosan nanoparticles in a HepG2 cell model. Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces 123:930–937CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Mehanny M, Hathout RM, Geneidi AS, Mansour S (2016) Bisdemethoxycurcumin loaded polymeric mixed micelles as potential anti-cancer remedy: preparation, optimization and cytotoxic evaluation in a HepG-2 cell model. J Mol Liq 214:162–170CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    El-Marakby EM, Hathout RM, Taha I, Mansour S, Mortada ND (2017) A novel serum-stable liver targeted cytotoxic system using valerate-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles surface decorated with glycyrrhizin. Int J Pharm 525(1):123–138CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Mehanny M, Hathout RM, Geneidi AS, Mansour S (2017) Studying the effect of physically-adsorbed coating polymers on the cytotoxic activity of optimized bisdemethoxycurcumin loaded-PLGA nanoparticles. J Biomed Mater Res A 105(5):1433–1445CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ofokansi K, Winter G, Fricker G, Coester C (2010) Matrix-loaded biodegradable gelatin nanoparticles as new approach to improve drug loading and delivery. Eur J Pharm Biopharm 76(1):1–9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Lu Z, Yeh TK, Tsai M, Au JL, Wientjes MG (2004) Paclitaxel-loaded gelatin nanoparticles for intravesical bladder cancer therapy. Clin Cancer Res 10(22):7677–7684CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Mohanty B, Aswal VK, Kohlbrecher J, Bohidar HB (2005) Synthesis of gelatin nanoparticles via simple coacervation. J Surf Sci Technol 21(3–4):149–160Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Li JK, Wang N, Wu XS (1998) Gelatin nanoencapsulation of protein/peptide drugs using an emulsifier-free emulsion method. J Microencapsul 15(2):163–172CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Cascone MG, Lazzeri L, Carmignani C, Zhu Z (2002) Gelatin nanoparticles produced by a simple W/O emulsion as delivery system for methotrexate. J Mater Sci Mater Med 13(5):523–526CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Khan SA, Schneider M (2013) Improvement of nanoprecipitation technique for preparation of gelatin nanoparticles and potential macromolecular drug loading. Macromol Biosci 13(4):455–463CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Lee EJ, Khan SA, Lim KH (2011) Gelatin nanoparticle preparation by nanoprecipitation. J Biomater Sci Polym Ed 22(4-6):753–771CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Zorzi GK, Contreras-Ruiz L, Parraga JE, Lopez-Garcia A, Bello RR, Diebold Y, Seijo B, Sanchez A (2011) Expression of MUC5AC in ocular surface epithelial cells using cationized gelatin nanoparticles. Mol Pharm 8(5):1783–1788CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Ethirajan A, Schoeller K, Musyanovych A, Ziener U, Landfester K (2008) Synthesis and optimization of gelatin nanoparticles using the miniemulsion process. Biomacromolecules 9(9):2383–2389CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Azimi B, Nourpanah P, Rabiee M, Arbab S (2014) Producing gelatin nanoparticles as delivery system for bovine serum albumin. Iran Biomed J 18(1):34–40PubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Akhter KF, Zhu J, Zhang J (2012) Nanoencapsulation of protein drug for controlled release. J Phys Chem Biophys S11:001–005CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Metwally AA, El-Ahmady SH, Hathout RM (2016) Selecting optimum protein nano-carriers for natural polyphenols using chemoinformatics tools. Phytomedicine 23(14):1764–1770CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of PharmacyAin Shams UniversityCairoEgypt
  2. 2.Department of Pharmaceutics, Health Sciences CenterKuwait UniversityKuwait CityKuwait

Personalised recommendations