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Measuring GPCR-Induced Activation of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTP) Using In-Gel and Colorimetric PTP Assays

  • Geneviève Hamel-Côté
  • Fanny Lapointe
  • Jana StankovaEmail author
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1947)

Abstract

Given the increasing amount of data showing the importance of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways, the modulation of this enzyme family by that type of receptor can become an important experimental question. Here, we describe two different methods, an in-gel and a colorimetric PTP assay, to evaluate the modulation of PTP activity after stimulation with GPCR agonists.

Key words

Protein-tyrosine phosphatase In-gel phosphatase assay Colorimetric phosphatase assay GPCR Phosphatase activity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by Canadian Institutes of Health Research grant (#MT6822).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Geneviève Hamel-Côté
    • 1
  • Fanny Lapointe
    • 1
  • Jana Stankova
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Division of Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health SciencesUniversité de SherbrookeQCCanada

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