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Sorghum pp 245-256 | Cite as

Background on Grain Sorghum Usage

  • John DuffEmail author
  • Austin Vincent
  • Doug Bice
  • Ian Hoeffner
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1931)

Abstract

Sorghum acreage increased significantly as a result of hybridization of the crop in the 1950s. This increase brought the cattle feeding industry to the High Plains; however, demand for the crop in this industry waned, and acres fell significantly due to unfavorable shifts in federal policy. The rise of the modern ethanol industry led to a resurgence in demand for sorghum and a subsequent increase in acres, and the interest generated by these occurrences led to greater interest in other end-uses such as food manufacturing. Sustainability is important to both these industries, so sorghum offers both significant benefits through its low water requirements and small carbon footprint.

Key words

Ethanol Renewable fuels Cereal grains Sustainability Carbon intensity Greenhouse gas 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Duff
    • 1
    Email author
  • Austin Vincent
    • 1
  • Doug Bice
    • 2
  • Ian Hoeffner
    • 1
  1. 1.National Sorghum ProducersLubbockUSA
  2. 2.United Sorghum Checkoff ProgramLubbockUSA

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