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Visualizing the Balbiani Body in Zebrafish Oocytes

  • KathyAnn L. Lee
  • Florence L. MarlowEmail author
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1920)

Abstract

Approaches to visualize the Balbiani body of zebrafish primary oocytes using protein, RNA, and mitochondrial markers are described. The method involves isolation, histology, staining, and microscopic examination of early zebrafish oocytes. These techniques can be applied to visualize gene products that are localized to the Balbiani body, and when applied to mutants can be used to decipher molecular and genetic pathways acting in Balbiani body development in early oocytes.

Key words

Oocyte Balbiani body Mitochondria RNA and protein localization Primary oocytes Buckyball Immunohistochemistry Microscopy Histology 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was partially supported by the National Institutes of Health R01GM089979.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Cell Developmental and Regenerative BiologyIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA

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