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Generation of Hepatic Organoids with Biliary Structures

  • Takeshi Katsuda
  • Takahiro Ochiya
  • Yasuyuki Sakai
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1905)

Abstract

Incorporation of bile drainage system into engineered liver tissue is an important issue to advance liver regenerative medicine. Our group reported that three-dimensional (3D) coculture of fetal liver cells (FLCs) and adult rat biliary epithelial cells (BECs) allows reconstruction of hepatic spheroids that possess bile ductular structures. In this chapter, we describe the detailed protocol to isolate FLCs and BECs and to generate the spheroids with bile drainage system using these two types of primary cells.

Key words

Biliary epithelial cell Fetal liver cell Bile ducts Hetero-spheroid 3D culture Tissue engineering 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by Grant-in-Aid for Young Scientists B (16K16643) and the Research Program on Hepatitis (16fk0310505h0005) from the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Katsuda
    • 1
  • Takahiro Ochiya
    • 1
  • Yasuyuki Sakai
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Molecular and Cellular MedicineNational Cancer Center Research InstituteTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Institute of Industrial ScienceThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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