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Coomassie Brilliant Blue Staining of Polyacrylamide Gels

  • Claudia Arndt
  • Stefanie Koristka
  • Anja Feldmann
  • Ralf Bergmann
  • Michael Bachmann
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1853)

Abstract

In the past a series of staining procedures for proteins were published. Still, the most commonly used staining dye for proteins is Coomassie Brilliant Blue. The major reason is that Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining is simple, fast, and sensitive. As Coomassie Brilliant Blue is almost insoluble in water a series of procedures including colloidal aqueous procedures has been described.

Key words

Coomassie Brilliant Blue Polyacrylamide gels Proteins 

References

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    Neuhoff V, Arold N, Taube D et al (1988) Improved staining of proteins in polyacrylamide gels including isoelectric focusing gels with clear background at nanogram sensitivity using Coomassie Brilliant Blue G-250 and R-250. Electrophoresis 9:255–262CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Claudia Arndt
    • 1
  • Stefanie Koristka
    • 1
  • Anja Feldmann
    • 1
  • Ralf Bergmann
    • 1
  • Michael Bachmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Radiopharmaceutical Cancer Research, Radioimmunology, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V. (HZDR)DresdenGermany

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