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Multiple Sclerosis

  • Tarek Nafee
  • Rodrigo Watanabe
  • Felipe FregniEmail author
Protocol
Part of the Neuromethods book series (NM, volume 138)

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis is proposed to be a neurological syndrome that may have a significant impact on patients’ functionality and quality of life. Due to the complexity of clinical trials in multiple sclerosis, conducting research studies in this field poses critical challenges to investigators. A review of the literature was conducted in the online database “Web of Science” for identifying the 100 most cited trials in multiple sclerosis. Articles published 2010 and 2015 were included. This chapter discusses the main insights that emerged from this review and presents fruitful suggestions for advancing the research scope in multiple sclerosis.

Keywords

Multiple sclerosis MS Disseminated sclerosis Review Clinical trial 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Neuromodulation, Center of Clinical Research Learning, Spaulding Rehabilitation HospitalHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Spaulding Research Institute, Spaulding Rehabilitation HospitalHarvard Medical SchoolCharlestownUSA

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