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Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Alzheimer’ Disease Drug Development

  • Stefan Holiga
  • Ahmed Abdulkadir
  • Stefan Klöppel
  • Juergen Dukart
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1750)

Abstract

While now commonly applied for studying human brain function the value of functional magnetic resonance imaging in drug development has only recently been recognized. Here we describe the different functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques applied in Alzheimer’s disease drug development with their applications, implementation guidelines, and potential pitfalls.

Key words

fMRI Alzheimer’s disease Treatment Prevention Biomarker Dementia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stefan Holiga
    • 1
  • Ahmed Abdulkadir
    • 2
  • Stefan Klöppel
    • 2
  • Juergen Dukart
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.F. Hoffmann-La Roche, pharma Research Early DevelopmentRoche Innovation Centre BaselBaselSwitzerland
  2. 2.University Hospital of Old Age Psychiatry and Psychotherapy BernBernSwitzerland
  3. 3.Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development, Neuroscience, Ophthalmology and Rare Diseases, Discovery and Translational AreaRoche Innovation Center BaselBaselSwitzerland

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