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Screening Applications to Test Cellular Fitness in Transwell® Models After Nanoparticle Treatment

  • Bastian Christ
  • Christina Fey
  • Alevtina Cubukova
  • Heike Walles
  • Sofia Dembski
  • Marco MetzgerEmail author
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1601)

Abstract

Nanoparticles (NPs) in biotechnology hold great promise for revolutionizing medical treatments and therapies. In order to bring NPs into clinical application there is a number of preclinical in vitro and in vivo tests, which have to be applied before. The initial in vitro evaluation includes a detailed physicochemical characterization as well as biocompatibility tests, among others. For determination of biocompatibility at the cellular level, the correct choice of the in vitro assay as well as NP pretreatment is absolutely essential. There are a variety of assay technologies available that use standard plate readers to measure metabolic markers to estimate the number of viable cells in culture. Each cell viability assay has its own set of advantages and disadvantages. Regardless of the assay method chosen, the major factors critical for reproducibility and success include: (1) choosing the right assay after comparing optical NP properties with the read-out method of the assay, (2) verifying colloidal stability of NPs in cell culture media, (3) preparing a sterile and stable NP dispersion in cell culture media used in the assay, (4) using a tightly controlled and consistent cell model allowing appropriate characterization of NPs. This chapter will briefly summarize these different critical points, which can occur during biocompatibility screening applications of NPs.

Key words

Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity assay Impedance spectroscopy Colloidal dispersion of nanoparticles 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors kindly thank the Fraunhofer Society and the Bavarian State ministry for economy and media, energy and technology (Az.:VI/3-6622/453/12) for financially supporting the work.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bastian Christ
    • 1
  • Christina Fey
    • 2
  • Alevtina Cubukova
    • 1
  • Heike Walles
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sofia Dembski
    • 2
    • 3
  • Marco Metzger
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Translational Center Würzburg “Regenerative Therapies for Oncology and Musculosceletal Diseases”, Branch of Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology IGBWürzburgGermany
  2. 2.Chair Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, University Hospital WürzburgWürzburgGermany
  3. 3.Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISCWürzburgGermany

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