Label-Free Immuno-Sensors for the Fast Detection of Listeria in Food

  • Alexandra Morlay
  • Agnès Roux
  • Vincent Templier
  • Félix Piat
  • Yoann Roupioz
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1600)

Abstract

Foodborne diseases are a major concern for both food industry and health organizations due to the economic costs and potential threats for human lives. For these reasons, specific regulations impose the research of pathogenic bacteria in food products. Nevertheless, current methods, references and alternatives, take up to several days and require many handling steps. In order to improve pathogen detection in food, we developed an immune-sensor, based on Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) and bacterial growth which allows the detection of a very low number of Listeria monocytogenes in food sample in one day. Adequate sensitivity is achieved by the deposition of several antibodies in a micro-array format allowing real-time detection. This label-free method thus reduces handling and time to result compared with current methods.

Key words

Listeria monocytogenes Food safety Antibody microarrays Immunosensor Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) Bacterial growth 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The work is part of a PhD thesis (A. M.) funded by the National Association for Research and Technology (ANRT n° 624/2013). This project was also partly supported by the Labex ARCANE program (ANR-11-LABX-0003-01).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alexandra Morlay
    • 1
  • Agnès Roux
    • 1
  • Vincent Templier
    • 1
  • Félix Piat
    • 2
  • Yoann Roupioz
    • 1
  1. 1.University Grenoble Alpes, SyMMES UMR 5819, CNRS, SyMMES UMR 5819, CEA, SyMMES UMR 5819GrenobleFrance
  2. 2.PrestodiagVillejuifFrance

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