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Protein-Based Strategies to Identify and Isolate Bacterial Virulence Factors

  • Rolf Lood
  • Inga-Maria Frick
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1535)

Abstract

Protein–protein interactions play important roles in bacterial pathogenesis. Surface-bound or secreted bacterial proteins are key in mediating bacterial virulence. Thus, these factors are of high importance to study in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms behind bacterial pathogenesis. Here, we present a protein-based strategy that can be used to identify and isolate bacterial proteins of importance for bacterial virulence, and allow for identification of both unknown host and bacterial factors. The methods described have among others successfully been used to identify and characterize several IgG-binding proteins, including protein G, protein H, and protein L.

Key words

Plasma adsorption Affinity purification Virulence factors Bacteria Release of bacterial surface proteins 

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council (project 7480) and The Crafoord Foundation.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Infection Medicine, Department of Clinical SciencesLund UniversityLundSweden

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