Quantitative Evaluation of the Enhanced Permeability and Retention (EPR) Effect

  • Luisa M. Russell
  • Charlene M. Dawidczyk
  • Peter C. Searson
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1530)

Abstract

Quantitative evaluation of nanoparticle delivery to a tumor site can be invaluable for cross-platform comparison, a consideration not currently taken into account by many in the field of cancer nanomedicine (Dawidczyk et al., Front Chem 2:69, 2014). Standardization of measured parameters and experimental design will facilitate nanoparticle design and understanding in the field. Here, we present a broadly applicable in vivo protocol for preclinical trials of nanomedicines, including pharmacokinetic modeling and recommendations for parameters to be reported for nanoparticle evaluation. The proposed protocol is simple and not prohibitively mouse-heavy, using procedures that are not overly complicated or difficult to learn, yet is a powerful way to analyze the effectiveness of new cancer nanomedicines against standard or more developed ones.

Key words

Tumor uptake Nanoparticles Enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect Drug delivery systems Pharmacokinetics 

References

  1. 1.
    Dawidczyk CM, Russell LM, Searson PC (2014) Nanomedicines for cancer therapy: state-of-the-art and limitations to pre-clinical studies that hinder future developments. Front Chem 2:69CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Dawidczyk CM, Russell LM, Searson PC (2015) Recommendations for benchmarking preclinical studies of nanomedicines. Cancer Res 75(19):4016–4020CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Wong AD, Ye M, Ulmschneider MB, Searson PC (2015) Quantitative analysis of the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. PLoS One 10(5)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luisa M. Russell
    • 1
    • 2
  • Charlene M. Dawidczyk
    • 1
    • 2
  • Peter C. Searson
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Materials Science and EngineeringJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Institute for NanoBioTechnologyJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.Department of OncologyJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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