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Mouse Models for Drug Discovery

Volume 1438 of the series Methods in Molecular Biology pp 271-291

Date:

Experimental Models of Anxiety for Drug Discovery and Brain Research

  • Peter C. HartAffiliated withDepartment of Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University Medical School
  • , Carisa L. BergnerAffiliated withDepartment of Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University Medical School
  • , Amanda N. SmolinskyAffiliated withDepartment of Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University Medical School
  • , Brett D. DufourAffiliated withDepartment of Animal Sciences, Purdue University
  • , Rupert J. EganAffiliated withDepartment of Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University Medical School
  • , Justin L. LaPorteAffiliated withStress Physiology and Research Center (SPaRC), Georgetown University Medical Center
  • , Allan V. KalueffAffiliated withDepartment of Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University Medical SchoolStress Physiology and Research Center (SPaRC), Georgetown University Medical CenterDepartment of Pharmacology, Tulane University Medical CenterDepartment of Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University Medical SchoolThe International Stress and Behavior Society (ISBS) and ZENEREI Research CenterResearch Institute of Marine Drugs and Nutrition, College of Food Science and Technology, Guangdong OceanUniversityInstitute of Translational Biomedicine, St. Petersburg State UniversityInstitutes of Chemical Technology and Natural Sciences, Ural Federal University Email author 

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Abstract

Animal models have been vital to recent advances in experimental neuroscience, including the modeling of common human brain disorders such as anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia. As mice express robust anxiety-like behaviors when exposed to stressors (e.g., novelty, bright light, or social confrontation), these phenotypes have clear utility in testing the effects of psychotropic drugs. Of specific interest is the extent to which mouse models can be used for the screening of new anxiolytic drugs and verification of their possible applications in humans. To address this problem, the present chapter will review different experimental models of mouse anxiety and discuss their utility for testing anxiolytic and anxiogenic drugs. Detailed protocols will be provided for these paradigms, and possible confounds will be addressed accordingly.

Key words

Anxiety Experimental animal models Anxiolytic drugs Anxiogenic drugs Biological psychiatry Exploration