Tissue MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MALDI MSI) of Peptides

  • Birte Beine
  • Hanna C. Diehl
  • Helmut E. Meyer
  • Corinna Henkel
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1394)

Abstract

Matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI MSI) is a technique to visualize molecular features of tissues based on mass detection. This chapter focuses on MALDI MSI of peptides and provides detailed operational instructions for sample preparation of cryoconserved and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue. Besides sample preparation we provide protocols for the MALDI measurement, tissue staining, and data analysis. On-tissue digestion and matrix application are described for two different commercially available and commonly used spraying devices: the SunCollect (SunChrom) and the ImagePrep (Bruker Daltonik GmbH).

Key words

MALDI imaging MSI Peptide Trypsin Matrix application ImagePrep SunCollect Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) Cryoconserved 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Birte Beine
    • 1
  • Hanna C. Diehl
    • 2
  • Helmut E. Meyer
    • 1
  • Corinna Henkel
    • 1
  1. 1.Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften—ISAS—e.V.DortmundGermany
  2. 2.Clinical Proteomics, Medizinisches Proteom-CenterRuhr-UniversityBochumGermany

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