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Determining Competitive Potential of Bone Metastatic Cancer Cells in the Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche

  • Sun H. Park
  • Matthew R. Eber
  • Russell S. Taichman
  • Yusuke Shiozawa
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series

Abstract

The ability of cancer cells to compete with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to target the bone marrow microenvironment, or the HSC niche, during the dissemination process is critical for the development of bone metastasis. Here, we describe the methods for testing the relative potential of cancer cells to compete with HSCs for occupancy of the HSC niche by measuring the peripheral blood level of engrafted HSCs by flow cytometry in mice after bone marrow transplantation and tandem cancer cell inoculation. This method is useful for determining the molecular mechanisms for the roles of HSCs in the regulation of bone metastases.

Keywords

Bone homing Bone marrow transplantation Disseminated tumor cells Flow cytometry Hematopoietic stem cell HSC niche Mouse model Niche competition 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is directly supported by Department of Defense (W81XWH-14-1-0403, Y. Shiozawa; W81XWH-17-1-0541, Y. Shiozawa), the Wake Forest Baptist Comprehensive Cancer Center Internal Pilot Funding (Y. Shiozawa), and the Wake Forest School of Medicine Internal Pilot Funding (Y. Shiozawa). Y Shiozawa is supported by the Translational Research Academy which is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS), National Institutes of Health, through Grant Award Number UL1TR001420. This work is also supported by the National Cancer Institute’s Cancer Center Support Grant award number P30CA012197 issued to the Wake Forest Baptist Comprehensive Cancer Center. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Cancer Institute. Sun H. Park and Matthew R. Eber have contributed equally to this work.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Cancer Biology and Comprehensive Cancer CenterWake Forest School of MedicineWinston-SalemUSA
  2. 2.Department of Periodontics and Oral MedicineUniversity of Michigan School of DentistryAnn ArborUSA

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