Evolutionary Ecology

ISSN: 0269-7653 (Print) 1573-8477 (Online)

Description

Evolutionary Ecology is a concept-oriented journal of biological research at the interface of ecology and evolution. We publish papers that therefore integrate both fields of research: research that seeks to explain the ecology of organisms in the context of evolution, or patterns of evolution as explained by ecological processes. 

The journal publishes original research and discussion concerning the evolutionary ecology of organisms. These may include papers addressing evolutionary aspects of population ecology, organismal interactions and coevolution, behaviour, life histories, communication, morphology, host-parasite interactions and disease ecology, as well as ecological aspects of genetic processes. The objective is to promote the conceptual, theoretical and empirical development of ecology and evolutionary biology; the scope extends to any organism or system.

In additional to Original Research articles, we publish Review articles that survey recent developments in the field of evolutionary ecology; Ideas & Perspectives articles which present new points of view and novel hypotheses; and Comments on articles recently published in Evolutionary Ecology or elsewhere. We also welcome New Tests of Existing Ideas - testing well-established hypotheses but with broader data or more methodologically rigorous approaches; - and shorter Natural History Notes, which aim to present new observations of organismal biology in the wild that may provide inspiration for future research. As of 2018, we now also invite Methods papers, to present or review new theoretical, practical or analytical methods used in evolutionary ecology.

We publish 7 types of papers:

1. Original Research articles, which present the results of empirical or theoretical research testing current ideas in evolutionary ecology;

2. Review articles, which survey recent developments in the field of evolutionary ecology;

3. Ideas & Perspectives articles, which present new points of view and/or novel hypotheses;

4. Methods papers, to present or review new theoretical, practical or analytical methods used in evolutionary ecology (as of 2018);

5. Comments on articles recently published in Evolutionary Ecology or elsewhere;

6. New Tests of Existing Ideas, which present tests of well-established hypotheses but with broader data or more methodologically rigorous approaches;

7. Natural History Notes, which present new observations of organismal biology in the wild that may provide inspiration for future evolutionary ecology research.

Browse Volumes & Issues