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Harris’s Hawks: All in the Family

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Urban Raptors

Abstract

From Phoenix, Arizona, south to Buenos Aires, Argentina, residents of many cities have Harris’s hawks (Parabuteo unicinctus) as neighbors. This intriguing raptor has adapted to human presence in many urban landscapes, generally without developing conflicts with human residents. Harris’s hawks are often popular among nature enthusiasts due to the species’ accessibility, large size, and easily recognizable plumage. Harris’s hawks have also garnered popularity because of their unique ecology as the proverbial wolves of the air; like a wolf pack, a family group of Harris’s hawks will work together to raise young and will hunt cooperatively.1,2

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© 2018 Cheryl R. Dykstra

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Boal, C.W., Dwyer, J.F. (2018). Harris’s Hawks: All in the Family. In: Boal, C.W., Dykstra, C.R. (eds) Urban Raptors. Island Press, Washington, DC. https://doi.org/10.5822/978-1-61091-841-1_9

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