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Combustion

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Abstract

If a conversation regarding chemical pollution begins with metals, fuel combustion cannot be far behind. In fact, the two are inextricably linked, as the extraction of metals from ore, also known as smelting, requires considerable heat. Combustion, whether employed to coax metals from ore, to cook dinner, or simply to heat a home, is a messy business in its own right. Whether the fuel combusted is wood, coal, or oil, the consequences of combustion are soot, ash, and smoke. As we shall see, exposure to these end products comes with a significant toxicological price tag.

Keywords

Aromatic Amine Smokeless Tobacco Chemical Carcinogen Increase Water Solubility Develop Bladder Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Alan Kolok 2016

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