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Restoration and Reciprocity: The Contributions of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

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Part of the Society for Ecological Restoration book series (SPER)

Abstract

Carol Crowe, an Algonquin ecologist, tells the story of explaining to one of her elders that she was traveling to a conference about sustainable development. The term was not familiar to him, so she explained the notion of managing resources in such a way that future generations would be able to obtain the same ecosystem services that are provided today, without impairment to the land. He was quiet for a time. The idea was hardly new to him. He then asked her to carry a message to the conference. He said, “This idea of sustainability sounds to me like the same old formula by which people simply continue to take from the earth. They just want to keep taking. You can’t just take. Tell them, that among our people our concern is not what we can take from the land, but what we can give.”

Keywords

  • Indigenous People
  • Ecological Restoration
  • Restoration Project
  • Cultural Landscape
  • Traditional Ecological Knowledge

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Correspondence to Robin Kimmerer .

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Kimmerer, R. (2011). Restoration and Reciprocity: The Contributions of Traditional Ecological Knowledge. In: Egan, D., Hjerpe, E.E., Abrams, J. (eds) Human Dimensions of Ecological Restoration. Society for Ecological Restoration. Island Press, Washington, DC. https://doi.org/10.5822/978-1-61091-039-2_18

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