Temporal evolution of within-season vineyard canopy response from a proximal sensing system

  • J. A. Taylor
  • S. Nuske
  • S. Singh
  • J. S. Hoffman
  • T. R. Bates
Conference paper

Abstract

A weekly survey of canopy NDVI with a proximal-mounted canopy sensor was undertaken in a cool-climate juicegrape vineyard. Sensing was performed at different positions in the canopy. Sensing around the top-wire led to saturation problems, however sensing in the growing region of the canopy led to consistently non-saturated results throughout the season. With this directed sensing, a spatial pattern in NDVI 2–4 weeks after flowering could be generated that approximated the spatial pattern in NDVI at the end of the season. This is earlier than has been previously reported and may allow for proactive within-season canopy management.

Keywords

Greenseeker NDVI time series position sensing 

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Copyright information

© Wageningen Academic Publishers The Netherlands 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Taylor
    • 1
  • S. Nuske
    • 2
  • S. Singh
    • 2
  • J. S. Hoffman
    • 1
  • T. R. Bates
    • 1
  1. 1.Cornell UniversityCLERELPortlandUSA
  2. 2.Robotics InstituteCarnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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